Artboard 33Artboard 16Artboard 18Artboard 13Artboard 42Artboard 21Artboard 4Artboard 5Artboard 45Artboard 22Artboard 7Artboard 42Artboard 23Artboard 12Artboard 28Artboard 17?Artboard 28Artboard 43Artboard 49Artboard 47Artboard 15Artboard 32Artboard 6Artboard 22Artboard 5Artboard 25Artboard 1Artboard 42Artboard 11Artboard 41Artboard 11Artboard 23Artboard 10Artboard 4Artboard 9Artboard 6Artboard 8Artboard 7Artboard 3Artboard 12Artboard 25Artboard 34Artboard 43Artboard 44Artboard 16Artboard 24Artboard 13Artboard 5Artboard 24Artboard 31Artboard 1Artboard 12Artboard 27Artboard 30Artboard 36Artboard 44Artboard 9Artboard 17Artboard 6Artboard 27Artboard 30Artboard 29Artboard 26Artboard 2Artboard 20Artboard 35Artboard 15Artboard 14Artboard 50Artboard 26Artboard 14Artboard 40Artboard 21Artboard 10Artboard 37Artboard 46Artboard 33Artboard 8
e-book

Charleston and the Emergence of Middle-Class Culture in the Revolutionary Era (Cód: 9495870)

Goloboy,Jennifer

LONGLEAF SERVICES (Livros Digitais)

Ooops! Este produto não está mais a venda.
Mas não se preocupe, temos uma versão atualizada para você.

Ooopss! Este produto está fora de linha, mas temos outras opções para você.
Veja nossas sugestões abaixo!

R$ 141,30

em até 4x de R$ 35,33 sem juros

Total:

Em até 1x sem juros de


Crédito:
Boleto:
Cartão Saraiva:

Total:

Em até 4x sem juros de


Charleston and the Emergence of Middle-Class Culture in the Revolutionary Era

R$141,30

Descrição

<p>Too often, says Jennifer L. Goloboy, we equate being middle class with 'niceness'—a set of values frozen in the antebellum period and centered on long-term economic and social progress and a close, nurturing family life. Goloboy’s case study of merchants in Charleston, South Carolina, looks to an earlier time to establish the roots of middle-class culture in America. She argues for a definition more applicable to the ruthless pursuit of profit in the early republic. To be middle class then was to be skilled at survival in the market economy.</p><p>What prompted cultural shifts in the early middle class, Goloboy shows, were market conditions. In Charleston, deference and restraint were the bywords of the colonial business climate, while rowdy ambition defined the post-Revolutionary era, which in turn gave way to institution building and professionalism in antebellum times. Goloboy’s research also supports a view of the Old South as neither precapitalist nor isolated from the rest of American culture, and it challenges the idea that post-Revolutionary Charleston was a port in decline by reminding us of a forgotten economic boom based on slave trading, cotton exporting, and trading as a neutral entity amid warring European states.</p><p>This fresh look at Charleston’s merchants lets us rethink the middle class in light of the new history of capitalism and its commitment to reintegrating the Old South into the world economy.</p>

Características

Peso 0.00 Kg
Produto sob encomenda Não
Marca LONGLEAF SERVICES (Livros Digitais)
Idioma 337
Acabamento e-book
Cód. Barras 9780820349954
AutorGoloboy,Jennifer